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Friends of Science hide the Decline, too

There was a hide-the-decline extravaganza at the recent Heartland science-alarmism conference in Chicago. Deltoid reported serious decline-hiding by James M. Taylor and Don Easterbrook. Our Friends of Science had blown all their money on their radio ads. Thus they could not afford the Greyhound tickets to Chicago and had to hide the decline from home, cowtown Calgary that is.

hidedeclineFoSapril2010

The above screenshot is taken from the FoS’s website. Here we give you the cookbook instructions how to hide the decline:
  • Always select a small time period of <15 years that is not representative of the overall trend and claim it is representative.
  • Cherry-pick a local near-maximum point as your starting point and NOT an inflexion point. The importance of the starting point for the slope of the regression is line crucial, as anybody knows who has installed gutters. In this case, the start of the fiscal year 2002 (1st Jan.) was choosen. Equally meaningful starting points of a temperature anomaly trend could be the Easter weekend, Victoria Day, VE day, FoS’s general annual meeting, Canada day, the Stanley Cup final, the Indianapolis 500, arrival of the oil-company cash, Thanksgiving, and Norm Kalmanovitch’s birthday.
  • Select a time interval without the warming effect of El Nino for your regression because it constitutes internal variability (weather), which is not representative for the intermediate or long-term trend.
  • Select a time interval that contains a cooling La Nina (e.g. 2008) and hide the fact that the resulting short-term cooling is not representative for the intermediate or long-term trend.
  • I repeat this: warming El Ninos don’t count, but cooling La Ninas do count very well as they support the agenda.
  • Or, as described, tilt the diagram’s Y axis clockwise towards parallelism with earth’s inclined axis.
  • Now you can claim that the world is cooling.
Carpe meum cerasium, o Harrius! (Pick my cherry, Harry! )